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WINE| Software on the moon | Brexit JTAG's |  WINE - Embedded Live |  Wireless anti-static | Free IO with Chips |  AESIN Conference | SW Warranties | HIS |  Windows is Dead ! Passwords (again)  |
 
 
 
You might have noted the "Two Weeks in the Summer" newsletter didn't appear. That is because we actually took some time out!   Thanks to technology, everyone else being on holiday,  and no emergencies happening we got away with it.  Also we had to get to grips with a new newsletter template and editor the results of which you can see here.
 
Coming up we have an array of conferences and trade shows.  Much of the information at these events is simply not on the internet and is never likely to be.  It is the  technical conversations you can have that are not filtered by corporate marketing. You can ask the questions and get a response tailored to you. The value of these events is far above the cost of attending.
 
 
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Lessons learnt on the way to the moon 50 years ago...
 
 
In 1969 Margaret Hamilton was a computer scientist doing the critical software for the moon landing "Her rigorous approach was so successful that no software bugs were ever known to have occurred during any crewed Apollo missions"

She invented the term software engineering

"...Also, what became apparent with Apollo – though it is not how it worked – is that it is better to define your system up front to minimise errors, rather than producing a bunch of code that then has to be corrected with patches on patches. It's a message that seems to have gone unheeded – in this respect, critical software today is still built the way it was 50 years ago."

My father said the same on aerospace systems in the 50's and 60's I also found the same to hold true in the 80's 90's 00's and even in this decade.  

If you have a system that is " so successful that no software bugs were ever known to have occurred" let me know.

Otherwise you might be better looking at the method Margaret described above: "it is better to define your system up front to minimise errors, rather than producing a bunch of code that then has to be corrected with patches on patches"


https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jul/13/margaret-hamilton-computer-scientist-interview-software-apollo-missions-1969-moon-landing-nasa-women
 
 
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Brexit and JTAG Debuggers
 
 
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We have no idea where Brexit is going (or has gone if you are reading this the day after we posted it) however whilst emailing software and licenses will be as fast a light before and after Brexit  there have been doubts on the speed of physical shipments from outside the UK.  

Therefore, Phaedrus Systems has got a small stock of Segger J-link debuggers so that we will be able to supply regardless.  Well, south of Hadrian's wall anyway! 

That is until the stock has gone. After that who knows?  Price and delivery my be unpredictable  On that thought if anyone is likely to need any hardware of any sort call us sooner rather than later.
 
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WNIE & Embedded Live 18-19 September at Stoneleigh, Coventry
 
 
WNIE – Embedded Live will encompass Everything Electronics: Embedded, Engineering, Design and Manufacturing.  A very useful show and conference that has moved to the Royal show ground at Stoneleigh. 

Whilst many of the things on display are on the internet so if you already know about them you can find them.  However, the conversations and information is not online.  You have to be there. These events are one of the most cost effective ways for a developer to spend a day.  
Link
 
This year we are exhibiting and speaking "Debugging is Difficult: so why do it?"   Debugging takes time, needs tools, and uses resources all of which COSTS MONEY: SO why do it?  There are more cost effective solutions but you will have to be there to hear the presentation.
 
 
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Wireless Anti-Static wristband
 
 
This was suggested to me  by someone in an electronics forum  as a useful addition to my workshop.  A wireless anti-static wristband.

It was actually something you could buy when I first looked at the page.  Even though is now "unavailable". the listing is still up many months (actually about a year from memory)  after it was fist reported.    

You do need to read the comments.  Some are in jest and some serious.   Some people, it appears believe it works.    As it is on the US Amazon, and the US does not do irony I think you have to take them at face value.

 
https://www.amazon.com/HDE-Adjustable-Anti-Static-Electrostatic-Discharge/dp/B002IXYR1U
 
 
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Free IO with your chips?
 
 
A few years ago I was speaking to one of my penetration testing contacts, who does pen test chips for chip design companies to provide assurance that the finished product is as was designed. And he told me that most of the Chinese manufacturers were adding several thousand I/O switches in the finished product that were never in the design. In some cases they could determine what these were doing, but in many they couldn't always say with confidence.

This story goes back to 2010, and I would imagine, where this is being done today, they have matured much further along the line. I would like to believe that the testing side of things has moved along too, but I don't actually hold as much hope of that being the case. 

In fact none as late last year I saw this item where additional unknown chips are being added to PCB's:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-10-04/the-big-hack-how-china-used-a-tiny-chip-to-infiltrate-america-s-top-companies

Time to go back  to pencils and notepads?
 
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wafer_(electronics)#/media/File:Wafer_2_Zoll_bis_8_Zoll_2.jpg
 
 
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AESIN Conference 2019 1ST October  NCC Birmingham
 
 
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The UK's premier automotive electronics and software event.   Along with headline keynotes from Industry (keynote talks will include Iain Forbes – Head of the UK Government's Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles and Laith Altimime – President of SEMI Europe) and updates from Government.

There will be three parallel conference tracks. These will consist of an Executive Track and two Technical Tracks covering AESIN's workstream areas – ADAS & HAV, Automotive Electronics Security, Clean & Connected Mobility and  More Electric Powertrain 


As always the information in these tracks is "not on the internet" and really worth knowing. Quite apart from the networking. .

Web site:
https://aesin.org.uk/aesin-conference-2019/


Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/aesin-conference-2019-tickets-54921169697
 
 
 
 
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Software Warranties
 
 
 
 

It is fitting that we have "borrowed" this item on warranties from Jack Ganssle's Imbedded Newsletter: http://www.ganssle.com/tem/tem370.html

The item in question was sent in by Larry R
I have a vague recollection of seeing some thing like what I paraphrased below, a few years ago. Sadly. I can't provide a citation for the source:
This software is not warranted to perform as specified. This software is not warranted against failure. This software is not warranted against causing harm. In fact, this software is not warranted in any way whatsoever. This is pretty much the same warranty as offered by our competitors; they just use bigger words.

Such refreshing honesty, however it is still accurate that virtually all software is still supplied with effectively  no useful warranty at all.


I was going to include an item on a major sales system that is used globally by many companies that had a glitch. All the accounts became open..... so they did the only safe thing and locked everyone out for a while as they sorted it.  However it would, in the current state of affair to single them out. However cloud based software is less easy to secure.than that behind a fire wall in one place.
 
 
 
 
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High Integrity Software conference, Bristol, 5th Nov 
 
 
 
 
This conference is essential for anyone in critical or high reliability systems which is why this annual event continues to grow. We assume you do not want to work on "unreliable" systems?

Now in its sixth year, the mission of the HIS conference is to share challenges, best practice and experience between software engineering practitioners. The conference features talks from industrial and academic specialists which disseminate experience and knowledge of important techniques and methods that are applicable across industry sectors. However most of the information isn't on the internet you have to be there.


See the conference Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UFV-w5c3QI

Keynote speakers: George Romero, FAA and Les Hatton, Kingston University.


Full information  is available at 
https://www.his-2019.co.uk/
 
 
 
 
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The End of Microsoft Windows
 
 
 
 
Windows is dead!  Long live Windows! I have had email in from an IT company offering migration services from Windows to Windows…. 

 It seems that Microsoft are End Of Life and removing support for the following widely (near 40% apparently) used systems still using Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 or SQL Server 2008?

Are you aware of the discontinuation of Extended Support for these versions of software?
Deadlines for your diary;
  •  Windows 7: 09/07/2019
  •  Windows 2008 Server: 14/01/2020
  •  SQL Server 2008: 14/02/2020
They said: With no further updates, patches or support being made available to these versions, you need to be thinking about your upgrade plan now if you're to migrate with as little disruption as possible.

OTOH you also need to think about archiving some PC's running Win7  (and XP and 98 and 3.1) for supporting legacy systems.  Remember it is not just the base unit but screens, keyboards and mice as well (where do you get PS2 mice? ) Also remember the cables to some of the, now obsolete, dev kit.  
 
 
 
 
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FreeRTOS STM32CubeMX generated project.
 
 
 
 
One of my customers using FreeRTOS on STM32CubeMX and has  shared his  architecture on Github for others to use. He says : I am planning to include Tracealyzer  support at some point. If you like you can use the code as an example of how to use it. I would also appreciate any suggestions on how to improve the code.  

Basic structure of an STM32CubeMX generated project.

https://github.com/Vavat/FreeRTOS_template
 
 
 
 
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Well that is the first newsletter on the new system.   As with all tools we had a learning curve and more time was spent on the system than writing the newsletter.  However next time the template is sorted and very easy to extend and will save a lot of time in the future. 

This is something we all need to bear in mind: powerful tools have a learning curve but then save a huge amount of ongoing time and effort. the first template tool a day or to and stood us in good stead for a decade.  Hopefully this one will do the same. 

It is interesting to note that despite online help etc. it was still a phone call , human to human, that sorted out the wrinkles fastest.  That is why meeting face to face at conferences trumps the internet every time.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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UK Tel  0808 1800 358    email: info@phaedsys.com  Web  www.phaedsys.com
 

PhaedruS SystemS Ltd, 96 Brambling, Tamworth, Staffs, B77 5PG, UK

Registered in England with Company Number 04120771
 
 
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